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#Diabetes and Your #Heart for #diabetics- #diabetic

You must keep blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol as close to normal as possible to protect your heart
KEEP AT IT. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try to add one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it.

Having diabetes is hard on your heart. You might worry more about other diabetes complications, like eye, kidney and nerve disease, but did you know that when you have diabetes there is a 80 percent chance you will die of heart disease? It's true; compared to a person who doesn't have diabetes, you are much more likely to have a heart attack, and heart problems are likely to be more severe and to strike you when you are younger.

Heart disease is also tremendously expensive to treat. As a result of the devastating human and economic toll, the medical community is paying much more attention to the diabetes–heart health connection. Scientists are trying to understand it better, and health care providers are trying to do something about it.
Diabetes and heart disease: what's the link?



In addition to the high risks that attend diabetes itself, people with diabetes often have two other major risks factors for heart disease:

    high blood pressure
    high cholesterol and triglyceride levels

Each of these conditions contributes to blood vessel damage; the vessels get blocked and less flexible, cutting off circulation to the heart and making it work too hard. This condition is called cardiovascular disease or CVD for short. People with diabetes are likely to suffer from other large blood vessel conditions, such as stroke, as well.
Be smart about your heart

Keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure and blood fat (cholesterol) levels as close to normal as possible can help keep your blood vessels healthy and protect your heart. Unfortunately, most people with diabetes don't know that. Most aren't aware that heart disease is the most deadly complication of diabetes, and very few know the specific things they can do to maintain heart health.

Recently a coalition of diabetes groups including the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association launched a project to give people with diabetes and their health care providers the information they need. This project is called, “Be Smart About Your Heart: Control the ABCs of Diabetes.” The message is clear: Take control of the ABCs of diabetes care and live a long and healthy life.



A is for A1c. The A1c (”A-one-c”) test – short for hemoglobin A1c – measures your average blood glucose over the last three months.

B is for blood pressure. High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard.

C is for cholesterol. ”Bad” cholesterol or LDL cholesterol builds up and clogs your arteries.

Do you know your ABC numbers? If you don't, be sure to get them from your health care provider. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends an A1c of less than or equal to 6.5 percent, and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends blood pressure below 130/80, and LDL cholesterol below 100. (The ADA recommends that people who have both diabetes and heart disease aim for an LDL cholesterol level below 70, using statin medications to reach this target). If any of your ABC numbers are higher than these targets, talk to your health care provider about actions you can take to reach your ABC targets. These actions could include changing your diet, getting more active, quitting smoking or taking medication.



Bottom line: anything you do to get closer to your ABC targets helps keep your heart healthy. For more on the “Be Smart About Your Heart” program, and lots of other useful diabetes information, visit the National Diabetes Education Project website at www.ndep.nih.gov or call 1 800 438-5383.
KEEP AT IT. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try to add one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it.

#Diabetics types of physical activity for people with #diabetes?- #Diabetic


Hello fellow diabetics. A short article today. So, start a mild excercise routine, some stretches, fast walking and some isometrics.
Running ShoesWalking vigorously, hiking, climbing stairs, swimming, aerobics, dancing, bicycling, skating, skiing, tennis, basketball, volleyball, or other sports are just some examples of physical activity that will work your large muscles, increase your heart rate, and make you breathe harder – important goals for fitness.

In addition, strength training exercises with hand weights, elastic bands, or weight machines can help you build muscle. Stretching helps to make you flexible and prevent soreness after other types of exercise.


Do physical activities you really like. The more fun you have, the more likely you will do it each day. It can be helpful to exercise with a family member or friend.


KEEP AT IT. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try to add one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it.

#Diabetic: #Diabetes The $232 Billion Dollar Pandemic #Diabetics



 

Defined in the narrowest sense, glycobiology is the study of the structure, biosynthesis, and biology of sugar that are widely distributed in nature. Sugars or  are essential components of all living things and aspects of the various roles they play in biology are researched in various medical, biochemical and biotechnological fields. 

You don't know what a paradigm shift is? Well, if I mentioned events and names like: Gutenberg, Copernicus, Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, and Werner von Braun you would probably guess a paradigm shift is major shift in thinkingand you would be right.

Back in the 1960's, Thomas Kuhn wrote a famous book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. In it, he destroyed the common misconception so many of us have about science.

We tend to think scientific progress is ushered in by a slow, line upon line, piece by piece development of thought over time.

Thomas Kuhn showed that, historically, scientific progress occurs in leaps and is always confronted by a struggle with an "old guard." The old scientific theorists hold tenaciously to their (usually tenured or profitable) positions and array themselves against the new discovery, attempting to drive it away.

But, the new guard - the new discoverers, inventors, explorers- takes the new discoveries and advances it over the thinking of the old establishment. Rarely is the old guard converted to the new patterns of thinking (new discovery). They just die off. The new position wins by attrition truthand perseverance.

Diabetes: The $232 billion dollar pandemic

Diabetes is on the front edge of such a paradigm shift.

Diabetes now afflicts over 30 million Americans. That is triple plus the number of people with diabetes just since 1991 alone. 



According to the CDC, one in every three Americans will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Let that sink in; one in every three Americans will develop diabetes in their lifetime. 

It is estimated over 60 million Americans can be classified as "pre-diabetes" meaning they have blood sugar levels higher than normal but still below the type 2 diagnosis level which helps to define diabetes.

By anyone's standard that is pandemic (goes far beyond epidemic proportions).  The cost for this carnage is over $232 BILLION DOLLARS. So much expense, grief and sorrow and unnecessary.

Diabetes: A reflection of our culture.

We are a fast food, sedentary, "get-our-fix-now" generation. More than one in every two Americans are overweight. We don't exercise as we should. All of which affects glucose levels.  Diabetes is a lifestyle disease and we've got the lifestyle.

Diabetes: The important announcement

That said, diabetes is a condition which CAN be turned around. Glyconutrition is the new discovery shaking the medical and scientific worlds. There are four Nobel Prizes and MIT testifying to the fact that glycobiology is one of the 10 technologies/discoveries which will shape our world.

Glyconutrition is more than just a promising new treatment for diabetes. Many are starting to whisper "VICTORY" over diabetes in their approach to disease.

Whether that is the case, time will tell. 

Oh no The problem is not a failure of glyconutrition. It is the building block VITAL to healthy cellular function and it is extremely vital to the proper functioning of the IMMUNE system. Those are known facts.

Diabetes is an auto-immune disease meaning, your body's immune system gets misguided messages. Thus, it starts attacking the islet cells in the pancreas which produces insulin. Voila...diabetes!


But, the problem is NOT whether glyconutrition really works. Anecdotal evidence (market buzz!) is already overwhelming in favor of glyconutritional therapy for diabetes. As is the professional research.

No the actual science is NOT the problem. The problem is the old guard again. Thomas Kuhn's book is almost prophetic. The old guard, the medical and pharmaceutical establishment, just can't accept the findings of (their own) research "What! A nutrient to treat diabetes?" "Hogwash," one can almost hear them say.

Actually, I wish they were saying that out loud. The reality is, they just ignore the issue. You see, too much is at stake. Like billions of dollars  $232 billion dollars. All of that money (read, "business") disappears if glyconutrition continues to "pan out" the way the research shows us. But, for now, the only thing "panning out" is a diabetes pandemic.

Yet, glyconutrition gets shunned as an official diabetes treatment approach.

A study published in the 1997 issue of the Proceedings of the Fisher Institute for Medical Research showed that people with type 1 diabetes who were given glyconutrients "reported a dramatic improvement in their health, including a decrease in vision problems, better wound healing, less infections, and lower blood pressure." (Miracle Sugars, by Rita Elkins, M.H., Woodland Publishing, p. 26)

"Glycobiology has achieved critical breakthroughs in the medical field, primarily by addressing what could be the greatest plague in health care today -- auto-immune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, arthritis, diabetes, Crohn's disease and colitis are just a few of these diseases." - Dr. Neecie Moore, Ph.D. (cf. Rita Elkins, M.H.
Miracle Sugars, Woodland Publishing, p. 18.)

Also, mannose (one glyconutrient) can stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin  "thus lowering the amount of insulin needed to control this disease." (Miracle Sugars, p. 27).



Reality Check:  The lives of 1 out of every 3 Americans are affected directly by diabetes and there is a $132 billion dollar diabetes pandemic running amuck in our midst. So, I sure hope this paradigm shift - glyconutrition - gets less opposition from the "powers that be" (the "old guard"), and is given its rightful place in the sunsoon.

But, with the money being made by the pharmaceuticals and their drugs, and the astoundingly simplistic view of disease treatment ("Blast that disease with technology and drugs!") it is doubtful if Thomas Kuhn's "paradigm shift" will work out any differently for diabetes across the land. 



The old guard will attack and ignore the discovery - arguably, the greatest in medical history in over a hundred years - and, a la Kuhn, they will simply go the way of the Dodo Bird and diabetes treatment will receive its due.

#Diabetic: #Diabetes A Pandemic for #diabetics


There was this guy who jumped off the 37th floor of a tall building.  As he fell, people at each floor inside the building heard him say as he passed them, "So far, so goodso far, so good..."

Diabetes is a disease which cannot be "trusted." I know that's an odd way of putting it, but bear with me for a moment here. As a medical professional, I have dealt with countless cases of diabetes. I have always been amazed people will plan for the future as they build lives, careers, families, dreamscreating and pursuing commitments for the long term And yet, one issue stands out consistently. People with diabetes tend to hope the disease will just "maintain itself," that it will just stay at status quo for the long term.

Diabetes cannot be trusted to stay anywheremuch less at status quo. Like the guy falling from the 37th floor, people with diabetes tend to keep telling themselves "So far, so goodso far, so goodso far, so good"  Folks, hope is NOT a strategy. It is a necessity, but it is NOT a strategy in dealing with a disease like diabetes.

Diabetes: The "fall out" is too great to ignore



As I said earlier, I am amazed how well people can plan for the long term, creating and pursuing future commitments but do NOT plan long-term for diabetes. Of course, the natural question is: "What are the long term issues with diabetes?"

With diabetes, a person is two to four times more likely to develop cardio-vascular disease. Being a cardio-vascular surgeon, I saw this particular problem constantly in my field. And I saw it consistently in young and middle aged people with diabetes.

With diabetes, people are TWENTY-FIVE times more likely to develop retinopathy (deterioration of the retinas). Because of diabetes, 24,000 people lose sight every year!

With diabetes, 60-70% of those afflicted suffer nerve damage which can lead to non-traumatic lower limb amputations. This is due to the fact that open sores that do not heal,  accompany diabetes. As they become ulcerated, the diabetic faces complications which can lead to amputation of limbs.

People with diabetes are AT RISK for kidney failure.

Diabetes is responsible for the increased risk for strokestwo to six times more likely because of their condition.

Diabetes: the good news or the bad news

Well, which do you wantthe good news or the bad news first?

As a doctor, having dealt with diabetes in many patients, it's always best to know the BAD news up front. Why? Complacency is harmful to your health. The danger with diabetes is people get complacent. Nothing seems to happen until, suddenly, it seems to sneak up on you with its complications

The bad news can be REALLY bad if you are someone who has any of the following conditions which terribly complicate diabetes. Complicating factors are:
1    smoking,
2    high cholesterol,
3    high blood pressure,
4    obesity,
5    physical inactivity

With these factors, predicting the progress of diabetes is very problematic. Simply put, they MUST be brought under control, if possible. Diabetes thus becomes very unpredictable.

By keeping your blood glucose under control, you can reduce the risk of complications of diabetes up to 76%. That's good news.

More good news: By healthy eating, responsible dietary weight loss, regular physical activity, monitoring blood sugar you can reduce risk in diabetes.

Bad news: Status quo again. You're still "stuck" with diabetes.

Diabetes: Being hit by "friendly fire."

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are auto-immune conditions. In type1 diabetes, the immune cells are mis-instructed to attack islet cells in the pancreas that make insulin.

Mind you, there is nothing wrong with the islet cells. There is MIScommunication by the immune system of the body. In other words, immune attack cells can get faulty messages and destroy healthy tissue. Isn't it just awful that your diabetes can be caused by "friendly fire?" (Military terminology here. The good guys are hitting their own good guys with artillery fire.)

MIS-communication . hum. Sounds like what's needed is a healthier communication system at the cellular level so the body isn't attacking its own healthy cells.

Now, for some really good news



Glyconutrition is the nutritional provision which provides the body with healthy CELLULAR COMMUNICATION.  In other words, for diabetes, this means less "friendly fire."

A study published in the 1997 issue of the Proceedings of the Fisher Institute for Medical Research showed people with type 1 diabetes who were given glyconutrients "reported a dramatic improvement in their health, including a decrease in vision problems, better wound hearing, less infections, and lower blood pressure." (Miracle Sugars, by Rita Elkins, M.H., Woodland Publishing, p. 26 -Excellent quick reference incidentally!)

Remember, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are auto-immune conditions. Read carefully, this next statement by medical researcher, Dr. Neecie Moore:

"Glycobiology has achieved critical breakthroughs in the medical field, primarily by addressing what could be the greatest plague in health care today -- auto-immune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, arthritis, diabetes, Crohn's disease and colitis are just a few of these diseases."

Research on glyconutrition is growing wonderfully.  For example, the Ophthalmology Department of Harvard University in 1995 reported that one of the glyconutrients (mannose) can be an energy source for diabetes (instead of the damaging glucose), providing energy without risk of eyesight damage. (Miracle Sugars, p.27).

Also, mannose can stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin  "thus lowering the amount of insulin needed to control this disease." (Miracle Sugars, p. 27. I told you this was a good book! In case you're wondering, I receive no remuneration from it whatsoever. Remember, I'm a physician. Doctors "make money the old fashioned way"they charge you.)

Oh yes. Glyconutrients are NON-prescription.  Anyone can get them and they are non-toxic (they're food!)  Safe, NON-prescription, effectiveThat's the stuff real medical discoveries are made of. Diabetes may very well become a scourge of the past.

Think of it. No more friendly fire.

No more diabetes "status quo."  

So far, so good


#HeartMonthChat: What Triggers #Heartburn or Acid Reflux? #heart

A common problem, Acid Reflux , you'd think it would be simple to spot and treat.


Acid Reflux also known as Heartburn - is caused when acid from the stomach backs up into the esophagus, causing an uncomfortable burning sensation.  Almost everyone experiences heartburn at some point in their life.  However if these symptoms occur more than two days a week for several months, a person may have Acid Reflux Disease, otherwise known as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

 Acid Reflux also known as Heartburn - is caused when acid from the stomach backs up into the esophagus, causing an uncomfortable burning sensation. 

Almost everyone experiences heartburn at some point in their life.  However if these symptoms occur more than two days a week for several months, a person may have Acid Reflux Disease, otherwise known as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

Acid reflux occurs when the valve separating the esophagus and stomach (known as the lower esophageal sphincter) does not close properly, allowing acid to travel up into the esophagus.   This often occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter relaxes more often than it should, and at inappropriate times.

Acid reflux can be triggered off by a number of things:

Eating the wrong food  - including acidic, spicy, or fatty food, or even over-eating before bedtime. 

A medical condition - can also trigger heartburn, including Hiatus Hernia, or pregnancy for example.

Lifestyle habits - are also to blame, like undue stress, smoking, or consuming excess caffienated beverages. 

Exercises - Lying down or bending over on a full stomach can also trigger heartburn, as can being overweight, along with any exercises that cause increased pressure on the abdomen, and wearing tight clothes.

Unless treated, Acid reflux disease may lead to more serious medical conditions.  Acid reflux can eventually erode the lining of the esophagus - a condition known as Erosive Esophagitis.


Gastroesophageal Reflux can even occur in infants a common symptom being spitting up.  More than half of all babies experience reflux during their first few months of life. A small number of infants can suffer severe symptoms due to Gastroesophageal Reflux.

Fortunately Acid reflux is curable and a doctor can prescribe appropriate treatments, some of which can heal areas of the esophagus that have been eroded by acid reflux. 


Make sure you’re getting enough beneficial bacteria from your diet by regularly consuming fermented foods. This will help balance your bowel flora, which can help eliminate H. pylori bacteria naturally
 

#Womenl #Heart disease strikes more women than men #HeartMonthChat



Although heart disease is the number one killer of women in Canada, very few women actually consider the disease a major health concern. In fact, women and their doctors often miss the symptoms of heart disease, passing them off as the normal aches and pains of aging or indigestion or stress.

The traditional belief that heart disease predominantly affects men is false. In 2009, 36 per cent of all female deaths in Canada were a result of heart disease compared to 34 per cent for males. As women age the risk of dying from heart disease increases dramatically. Researchers believe that after menopause women lose the heart protecting benefits of estrogen. The result is a steep increase in heart disease and death. Women need to educate themselves on the risks of this deadly disease and play an active role in their own heart health.


It is not all bad news. Medical discoveries are paving the way to better preventive treatments. A recent landmark study investigated a new treatment for both men and women with coronary disease who are what cardiologists consider 'low-risk' but nevertheless are dying even though they feel quite well until a few days before they die. This important international study, EUROPA, provides compelling evidence that heart attacks and death can be significantly reduced in patients with coronary artery disease when the common and well studied ACE Inhibitor perindopril (Coversyl®) is added to their daily treatment regimen. Considering that half of all heart disease deaths in women are from coronary artery disease, this is both a milestone in cardiology and a major step forward for women.

#HeartMonthChat Vitamin K’s Unique Power for your #heart


Recent evidence suggests vitamin K is an important adjunct to vitamin D, and if you are deficient in one, neither works optimally in your body. As you may already know, vitamin D is a key player in your overall health.
How well do you know about vitamin K? This vitamin is probably not as popular as other vitamins. But still you need this vitamin for your health. So, never underestimate vitamin K! Without vitamin K you will be in miserable. In fact, vitamin K is one of the most extraordinary anti-aging vitamins ever discovered. A research shows that vitamin K has unique powers, not only to help blood coagulate or to make you look younger, but also has so many other benefits.

Let see what vitamin K benefit are! You may surprise how vitamin K can prevent heart disease and osteoporosis at the same time. This is unusual things compare to other vitamin. Beside that, the antioxidant in vitamin K is stronger than other vitamin which is believed can treat certain kinds of cancer. The researcher is still doing some more tests on this matter.

More to Know about Vitamin K

How can vitamin K prevent heart disease and osteoporosis at the same time? You imagine vitamin K that could keep calcium in bones and out of arteries. That vitamin could stop heart attack and osteoporosis at the same time because it works by regulating calcium. Bones need it, arteries can't stand it. Vitamin K accommodates both. Vitamin K aids in the production of prothrombin, a compound required for normal clotting of blood and is necessary for proper bone formation.

Are you curious where do you get this vitamin K from? Actually, there are some foods contain vitamin K which fortunately can be bought easily in the market. Vitamin K is found in a variety of foods such as Brussels sprouts, chopped broccoli, cauliflower, Swiss chard, spinach, loose-leaf lettuce, carrot, green beans, asparagus, egg, strawberry, avocado, and peapods. Other significant sources would be soybean oil, olive oil, cottonseed oil, and canola oil. Well, here is a tip: the greener the plant, the higher the Vitamin K inside it. Got that?

How much vitamin K you should take? Although, it is still in question, some said that the standard dietary allowance for Vitamin K is about 1 mcg per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day or about 65 to 80 mcg per day for most adults. But that is also depend on age, diet, and what stressors are present. But you no need to worry if having too much vitamin K in your body. High amounts of vitamin K will not cause your blood to overcoagulate. Coagulation proteins only have a certain number of spaces for vitamin K. Once those spaces are filled, vitamin K cannot affect coagulation proteins.


If you feel you don’t get enough vitamin K from your foods, it’s easy for you to have supplement vitamin K.


To date, there is no evidence that high intake of vitamin K from food has negative consequences, including promoting thrombosis. For patients taking warfarin, elimination of vitamin K from the diet may help stabilize anticoagulation but may also have long-term negative consequences. 

An alternative recommendation would be to encourage daily consumption of a consistent level of vitamin K intake. To assist practitioners and patients, values of the vitamin K content of foods are continuously updated and are available (: http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00).

#Diabetics: Vitamin D deficiency can cause #diabetes - #diabetic


 There is some research showing that young people who have higher vitamin D levels decreased their chances of developing type 2 diabetes later in life compared to people who had lower vitamin D levels. Studies have also shown that vitamin D supplements can help some symptoms of type 2 diabetes.
People who have low levels of vitamin D are more likely to have diabetes, regardless of how much they weigh, says a new study.
The findings suggest that besides maintaining a healthy diet, people can reduce their risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders by spending some time on outdoor activities.
Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and maintain bone and muscle health. The skin naturally produces this vitamin after exposure to sunlight. People also absorb smaller amounts of the vitamin through foods, such as milk fortified with vitamin D.
“Our findings indicate that vitamin D is associated more closely with glucose metabolism than obesity,” said one of the study authors, Manuel Macas-Gonzilez from the University of Malaga in Spain.

Earlier studies had found that people who have low levels of vitamin D are more likely to be obese. The current study found that vitamin D levels were directly correlated with glucose levels, but not with Body Mass Index (BMI).
The researchers compared vitamin D biomarkers in 148 participants. All participants were classified by their BMI as well as whether they had diabetes, pre-diabetes or no glycemic disorders.

Researchers measured levels of vitamin D in the participants’ blood streams and vitamin D receptor gene expression in adipose tissue.



The analysis found that obese participants who did not have glucose metabolism disorders had higher levels of vitamin D than diabetic participants.
Likewise, lean subjects with diabetes or another glucose metabolism disorder were more likely to have low levels of vitamin D.

Several studies have looked at how much vitamin D people get and if they develop type 2 diabetes later in life. There have been three recent reviews, where researchers looked at all the studies out there on vitamin D and type 2 diabetes, combined them, and determined there is a connection between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes.

How to Prevent Heart Disease- #heartdisease

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Do physical activities you really like. The more fun you have, the more likely you will do it each day. It can be helpful to exercise with a family member or friend. 


You should always keep in mind that whatever actions you do today can either help to prevent, delay or minimize the effect of heart disease or worsen it. The key is to control risk factors. Granted that you cannot control every risk factor for heart disease such as family history but you can definitely do something about your behavior. Age and gender also influence your risk of heart disease. 


Major Risk Factors of Heart Disease
 
  • Cholesterol Levels
Cholesterol is a type of a lipid, a soft, fatlike substance that serves as a source of fuel. Excessive cholesterol can cause buildup of atherosclerotic plaque. Accumulation of plaque in arteries can block blood flow and lead to a heart attack. LDL cholesterol, the so-called "bad" cholesterol, is transported to sites throughout the body, where it's used to repair cell membranes or to make hormones. LDL cholesterol can accumulate in the walls of your arteries. HDL cholesterol, the so-called "good" cholesterol, transports cholesterol to the liver, where it's altered and removed from the body.
  • Blood Pressure
Normal blood pressure level is defined as less than 130 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for systolic blood pressure and less than 85 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The higher the blood pressure, the more likely it is to take a toll on the heart and on the brain. Blood pressure should be checked whether or not your levels are high. For normal, check once every two years. For high-normal, check once a year. If extremely high, you should get immediate care. Then get multiple measurements to know if a high level is sustained over time.
  • Diabetes 
 Another risk factor for heart disease is #diabetes, a chronic disease of #insulin deficiency or resistance. Type 2 diabetes, the most common type, is associated with obesity and may be prevented by maintaining ideal body weight through exercise and balanced nutrition. 

Tips For Controlling Risk of Heart Disease 

  • Stop Smoking
The effect of smoking on your lungs can cause almost every other medical condition.
Get Active
Routine physical activity is highly recommended and helpful in controlling obesity. Try to perform 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every day. Fast walking is one of the best way to prevent heart disease. If you can lose even a small amount of weight, five pounds for example, it may have a positive effect on lipid levels and blood pressure preventing heart disease.
  • Limit Alcohol Consumption
Limit daily alcohol intake to three ounces or fewer to prevent heart disease. People who drink large amounts of alcohol (six to eight ounces a day) tend to have higher blood pressure.
  • Watch What You Eat
Eat five helpings of fruits and vegetables daily to prevent heart disease.
Maintain adequate dietary potassium, calcium and magnesium intake.
Reduce saturated fats and cholesterol to stay away from heart disease. 

  SEEK HELP. You don’t have to prevent heart disease alone. Ask your family and friends to help you out. Involve them in your activities. You can help each other move more, eat less, and live a healthy life. Go for a walk together or play a pick-up game of basketball. Join a support group in your area to help you stay on track.

    KEEP AT IT. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try to add one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it.
 

#Men #Pomegranates can Be The New #Prostate #Cancer Natural Cure

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Pomegranates have long been used in traditional folk remedies to treat sore throats, inflammation, and rheumatism. And recent scientific research has suggested they are also potentially effective in both preventing and treating prostate cancer.

One study, conducted on human prostate cancer cells in lab dishes, at the University of Wisconsin, found that there were dose dependant improvements. Another study at the same facility injected mice with human prostate cancer cells. These mice developed malignancies. Some mice were fed plain water, whilst two other groups of mice were given water mixed with different concentrations of pomegranate extract.

Those mice that had water only had tumors that grew much faster than the pomegranate and water groups. The quantities given to the mice were comparable to that which people might get if they drank pomegranate juice on a daily basis. And whilst pomegranate juice hasn't been tested on humans with prostate cancer yet, the results are very good.

The study did not indicate what aspects of pomegranate juice were responsible for slowing down prostate tumour growth. But the scientists involved did mention the antioxidant polyphenolic compounds, which are more effective than green tea and red wine.

Pomegranate extract not only inhibited the growth of cancer cells, it also worked by another means - apoptosis.

Apoptosis refers to a way that cells can die. Cancer growths are characterized by an uncontrolled growth of cells that do not follow the normal processes of cellular differentiation of regular, healthy cells. Cellular differentiation means that the characteristics of a cell change and get the functions that a mature, healthy cell would. For example, liver cells have specialized liver functions, as do prostate, breast, kidney, and all other types of cells. This is normal and healthy.

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In tumour growths, although some cells fully differentiate, many only differentiate partially, and some not at all. And the tumors which have more undifferentiated cells grow faster. So, inducing cellular differentiation is one approach to cancer treatment. The other two ways that doctors and researchers try to treat cancer is by causing the death of cancerous cells. They do this through apoptosis, mentioned above, and necrosis.

In apoptosis, cell death is programmed into the cell when it is 'born'. So the cell dies in a more natural way that is less destructive on its environment. By this I mean it doesn't cause inflammation and the damage associated with it to neighboring cells that may be healthy. Cells die either when they reach cellular old age or when their death benefits the body as a whole. Necrosis, on the other hand, does cause inflammation.

Generally, prostate cancer grows very slowly, although it is unpredictable and can grow quickly and spread.

#Men A Little About #Prostate #Cancer #sex

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Prostate cancer affects an estimated one out of every six males. Therefore it's understandable that most men want to know at least something about prostate cancer, especially as they are approaching their 40s. This article is going to touch on some of the symptoms and treatments, as well as some of the side effects that come from prostate cancer and prostate cancer treatment. This article is not intended to be a substitution for your doctor's advice, so make sure that you seek a professional opinion if you feel that you may have prostate cancer.

One thing that's important to note is that you may not suffer any symptoms at all. That is why it's very important to be checked for prostate cancer frequently, and especially more so as you get older because they can find the prostate cancer before any symptoms show up at all in most cases. Some men that have prostate cancer may experience some of the following symptoms. Frequent or difficult urination, as well as a weak urine flow, erectile dysfunction as well as painful ejaculation and blood in the urine or semen.

There are many different treatment options for prostate cancer and you will want to discuss these with your doctor or healthcare professional before any decision is made. A few of the choices are active surveillance, radiation or hormone therapy, chemotherapy or surgery. There are also other choices and as I said before you should discuss these with your doctor.

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One of the best things that you can do for your prostate is to make sure you take care of it in the first place. This may reduce your risk of prostate cancer. Just knowing some simple things such as taking vitamin E, eating plenty of fruits and vegetables and being informed about eating fats and red meat can reduce your risk of prostate cancer.

What You Should Know about #Celiac Disease #gluten #digestive


Celiac disease is a  disorder caused by the by consumption of gluten, a protein commonly found in many grains, especially wheat, barley & rye. Therefore, those products containing these grains MUST be avoided by those diagnosed with celiac disease. Among those products to be especially mindful of are: bread, pasta, cookies, pizza crust and other foods containing wheat, barley or rye. Oats may contain gluten as well, but this is currently in dispute due to the fact that SOME seem to be able to digest oats without consequence. It is important that you followed your doctor's advice in this matter. When a person with celiac disease eats foods containing gluten, an immune reaction occurs in the small intestine, resulting in damage to the surface of the small intestine and an inability to absorb certain nutrients from food.

Eventually, decreased absorption of nutrients (malabsorption) can cause vitamin deficiencies that deprive your brain, peripheral nervous system, bones, liver and other organs of vital nourishment, which can lead to other illnesses. This is especially serious in children, who need proper nutrition to develop and grow. Many who suffer celiac disease also develop related vitamin and mineral defeciency related dieases.

Also known as celiac sprue, celiac disease occurs in people who have a susceptibility to gluten intolerance. Although celiac disease affects people of all races, it is most prevalent in those of white European ancestry. It also affects women to a greater extent than me. Celiac disease has been around as long as man has eaten wheat and other grains containing the protein, but it has only been in the last 50 years that researchers have gained a better understanding of the condition and how to treat it.


No treatment can cure celiac disease. However, you can effectively manage celiac disease through the elimination of gluten products from your diet.

What is #Celiac? #diarrhea #gluten

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Diane Jakubowski was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in spring of 2008,and her somewhat confused physician sent Jakubowski to the nearest health food market for answers. Celiac Disease, also known as Celiac Sprue, is a genetically-linked autoimmune disease in which the absorbing surface of the small intestine is damaged by gluten, the protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and sometimes even oats. But as recently as two years ago, this illness was considered very rare in this country, leaving many Celiacs misdiagnosed, under diagnosed, or simply overlooked altogether.

Approximately 1 in 4700 people in the USA are diagnosed Celiacs. But recent medical research indicates that this figure is extraordinarily inaccurate. Suddenly, the long-accepted thinking that Celiac Disease was rare has literally exploded off of the medical horizon. It is now known that 1 in 133 folks in this country (or more) are probably Celiacs...again going undiagnosed...and suffering needlessly for many years.

In Celiac Disease, nutrients pass through the damaged small intestine, unabsorbed, often creating a host of sometimes devastating health problems. Medical conditions and diseases that have been associated with Celiac Disease are: iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, gum problems, skin problems, Multiple Sclerosis, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, peripheral neuropathy, and infertility.

Celiac Disease is frequently misdiagnosed as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, proctitis) pancreatitis, and even gall bladder disease, to name but a few. There are literally millions of Celiac's running around in this country.who don't even know they are Celiacs. And the really significant additional concern is that all these folks are simultaneously running the risk of developing secondary autoimmune disease. This, due to the fact that many Celiacs go undiagnosed an average of eleven yearsor even longer.  In the author's case, it was 52 years.


Jakubowski's desire is that people will be able to gain answers through information that has been made available on her website. Her wish is that sharing this information may possibly provide a service for  those who suffer from digestive disease for decades due to the direct or indirect impact of this insidious disease.

#Diabetics #Diabetes and #Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection #Diabetic


KEEP AT IT. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try to add one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it. 

A strong link between diabetes and heart disease is now well established. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center several years ago showed a two- to threefold increase in the incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared with those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack or stroke is by far the leading cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations.

Several advances in the treatment of heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so has the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival has been less than half as much as in the general population.
Why Is Heart Disease So Common in People With Diabetes?

Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease; however, a variety of mechanisms—not solely blood glucose levels—most likely come into play. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to other well-established risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and more than 90% of patients with diabetes have one or more of these additional risk factors.

Some of the increased susceptibility to blood vessel damage that people with diabetes have could be due to the long-term effects of inadequate control of blood glucose levels on the tissues or as a result of other cell damage related to diabetes. There is also evidence that being overweight, having a sedentary lifestyle and poor blood glucose control contribute to the increased chance of high blood pressure and abnormalities in blood lipids (i.e., high cholesterol, high triglycerides and a low level of HDL cholesterol—the “good” cholesterol.

Research on the role of additional risk factors is being conducted. Evidence shows that patients with diabetes have an increased level of low-grade inflammation of their arterial lining, a process that initiates the blood vessel changes leading to heart disease. Some of the new tests to assess this inflammation are being evaluated, including C-reactive protein and homocysteine.

How to Prevent or Delay Heart Disease

The best way to prevent or delay the development of cardiovascular disease is to prevent diabetes itself. People with increased risk for diabetes can be identified. A large National Institutes of Health-sponsored study, the Diabetes Prevention Program, and other studies have proven that modest weight reduction and a 30-minute exercise routine five days a week can reduce the development of type 2 diabetes over three years by more than 50%. Moreover, even people at risk for diabetes or those with prediabetes, in addition to those with diabetes, frequently have abnormalities in blood pressure and lipid levels that can be detected and treated to prevent cardiovascular disease.


Weight control and smoking cessation are two important lifestyle measures that have an impact on preventing heart disease. Studies show that even in overweight people, regular physical activity has major cardiovascular benefits.

In the last 10 years, large-scale research studies around the world have shown that optimal control of LDL cholesterol (the “bad” cholesterol) and blood pressure can prevent adverse cardiovascular outcomes by 30% to 50%. The American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend an LDL cholesterol goal in all adults with diabetes at less than 100 mg/dl. In people who already have heart disease, a more desirable LDL cholesterol goal should be less than 70 mg/dl, based on evidence from more recent studies. The blood pressure goal in all patients with diabetes is less than 130/80. In most patients with diabetes, reaching these targets for blood pressure could require two or more medications. Fortunately, we have safe and effective medications available to help patients meet their lipid and blood pressure goals.

In addition, good control of blood glucose levels and low-dose aspirin can add to these benefits. For A1C tests—a measure of average blood glucose levels over the preceding two to three months—the goal is less than 7%..
Take Action

To sum up:  there's no totally certain way to avoid heart disease and circulation problems. But there are lots of things to do to cut your risk.

    If you smoke, stop.
    Lose weight if you are overweight
    Keep your blood pressure in the proper range
    Get regular physical activity
    Keep your blood fats and cholesterol levels in a healthy range
    Keep your blood glucose under control

#Diabetics Does #Menopause Increase Risk of #Diabetes? #Diabetic


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Heredity is a major factor of diabetes. That diabetes can be inherited has been known for centuries. However, the pattern of inheritance is not fully understood. Statistic indicates that those with a family history of the disease have a higher risk of developing diabetes than those without such a background. The risk factor is 25 to 33 percent more.

An idea that has been hinted at for some time, and its answer is important for all middle-aged women. Does menopause influence one's risk for type 2 diabetes? With the latest health news, smile, because researchers found the answer to be "NO."

Postmenopausal women had no higher risk for diabetes whether they experienced natural menopause or had their ovaries removed,according to the national clinical trial of 1,237 women at high risk for diabetes, ages 40 to 65.

In other words, menopause had no additional effect on risk for diabetes. Menopause remains one of many small steps in aging and it doesn't mean women's health will be worse after going through this transition. The results are published in the August issue of "Menopause."

The findings also shed light on the impact of diet and exercise and hormone replacement therapy on the health of postmenopausal women. Previous studies had shown that menopause could speed the progression to diabetes because of the higher levels of testosterone. All the women in the study had "glucose intolerance," meaning their bodies struggled to process blood sugar into energy.

The researchers have shown that lifestyle interventions can help prevent diabetes in those with glucose intolerance.These interventions work well in women who have gone through menopause.

According to the new study, for every year 100 women observed, 11.8 pre-menopausal women developed diabetes, compared to 10.5 among women in natural menopause and 12.9 cases among women who had their ovaries removed.

But for those who had their ovaries removed and engaged in lifestyle changes, the rate of diabetes plummeted to 1.1. Those changes included losing seven percent of their body weight (that would be 12.6 pounds for a 180-pound woman) and exercising for at least 150 minutes a week.

They found these results surprising, as the women had gone on hormone? replacement therapy, which many fear escalates the risk for many health issues. The message to take away from this is that lifestyle changes to shed pounds could reduce your risk of developing diabetes.



If neglected, diabetes can lead to various complications such as damage to the kidneys, heart disease, nerve damage, hypoglycemia (drastic reduction in glucose levels). Diabetes is a serious disease and there is no treatment of it. However, it can be brought under control by proper diabet diet.

#Diabetes and #Heart Disease for #Diabetics #diabetic


Stop Smoking

This is the single most important thing you can do! Nicotine narrows and restricts blood vessels. So does having diabetes. You can't change having diabetes. But you can stop damage caused by nicotine. Join a stop smoking group. Get support. Plan to quit. Cut back. And then, stop!

Lose Weight If Overweight

Being overweight tends to increase your blood glucose, blood pressure and blood fat levels. Even a modest 10-20 pound weight loss will improve your levels. To lose weight, skip crash weight loss programs. Emphasize eating healthy foods that are low-fat and high-fiber and increase your physical activity. These will help keep your blood glucose and blood fat levels in a healthy range. Check with your healthcare provider to determine how to safely increase your physical activity.

Keep Blood Pressure in Control

High blood pressure increases the risk of stroke. Have your blood pressure tested at least twice a year. If your blood pressure is over 130/80, lose weight. This is a lower target than for people who don't have diabetes. Follow a low-salt meal plan. Increase your physical activity. And ask your healthcare provider about medications to lower blood pressure.

Get More Physical Activity

Physical Activity keeps your heart healthy, and helps keep blood glucose and blood fat levels in control. So don't be a couch potato. Talk with an exercise specialist to start a sensible physical activity program. Be sure to check with your healthcare provider before beginning or increaseing you physical activity program. Also be sure to ask if there are types of exercise you should not do because of other diabetes complications you have.

Define a set schedule for physical activity. Put it in your calendar. Stick to it. You'll be surprised how much better you feel!

Keep Your Blood Fats and Cholesterol in Control

High levels of blood fats, including cholesterol, increase the risk of heart disease. Because you have diabetes, you are more likely to have high blood fat levels. So pay special attention! Know your blood fat levels. There is now proof that lowering levels of so-called bad cholesterol (LDL cholesterol) in persons with diabetes greatly lowers the risk of a heart attack. Your target levels should be lower than those of someone without diabetes.

Your level of HDL (so-called good cholesterol) should be greater than 40 for men and  greater than 50 for women. Your level of LDL (so-called bad cholesterol) should be under 100. Your triglyceride level (another bad fat) should be under 150.

To reach these goals, follow a low-fat, high-fiber, lower calorie meal plan — weight loss decreases blood fat levels. See a dietitian for help. Get more physical activity, because physical activity lowers levels of bad fats and increases levels of good fats. Blood fat lowering medications may be needed if your cholesterol levels don't respond to these treatments.

Keep Blood Glucose in Check


Monitor your blood glucose regularly (according to how you were taught). Know how to take action based on your blood glucose checks. Know how to adjust your medication, exercise and meal plan if plasma blood glucose is unusually high (higher than 180 mg/dl two hours after eating or higher than 130 mg/dl before eating) or unusually low (lower than 70 mg/dl or below 90mg/dl with symptoms). High blood glucose increases the risk for all other complications of diabetes, so it’s important to know your blood glucose levels.

Know your target A1C. Hemoglobin A1C is a blood test your healthcare provider performs to tell how well your blood glucose has been controlled over the past two months or so. Your A1C should be lower than 7%. If it is running higher than 7% and nearer to 8.0%, or even higher, ask your diabetes treatment team for help with your treatment plan.

#Diabetics When you get Sick and have #Gestational #Diabetes #diabetic


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Aside from the morning sickness that many women suffer from in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, you may catch a cold or the flu before your baby is born.  In of itself, this
isn’t a fun experience but when you have gestational diabetes and are on insulin it is very important that you take extra good care of yourself.

It is important to remember that no matter how you are feeling, you need to take your insulin.  Your body relies on the external source of insulin and needs it to keep
functioning properly.  But what do you do if you have the flu and are vomiting or don’t have any appetite to eat.  As a short term solution, take your insulin and drink a soda that
is not diet (you want the sugar in this case).  If you are able to, nibble on crackers or dry toast.  All the while, you need to keep a very close eye on your glucose levels with your
monitor. 


You need to balance the insulin you are taking and the food you are consuming so your blood sugar levels do not drop.  If you are unsure of what to do, contact your doctor.  A
better plan is to have this discussion with your doctor before you get sick.  Your health care provider will give you guidelines to follow when you become ill and when you
should contact the office or go to the hospital if things are progressively getting worse.

Getting sick is never fun but being pregnant and sick isn’t just about you.  You have to still take care of your baby and yourself.  Be aware that when you are sick, your blood
sugars may not act as they normally do, test more often to keep track of what the results are.

#Diabetics #Gestational #Diabetes Risks for Child #diabetic

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When you first discover that you have gestational diabetes most likely you are going to be upset and worried about your baby.  There are risks to the baby when a mother has gestational diabetes but with careful monitoring and strict control of diet and blood glucose levels these risks can be minimized.

The most frequent complication associated with babies whose mothers have had 
gestational diabetes is how big they become.  The extra glucose in the mother’s system is also shared by the baby and the baby creates extra insulin which in turn produces 
unneeded fat stores this is not healthy for the baby and the baby’s size can become 
dangerous. A large baby (known as macrosomia) can make labor and delivery more 
difficult. The baby can get injured during delivery (shoulder injuries are common) and a higher percentage of moms with gestational diabetes having a caesarian section.

If your diabetes is poorly controlled while you are pregnant your baby will be born 
producing more insulin than it should.  Once the baby is born and is no longer exposed to your high glucose levels, he or she will still be producing insulin at the same rate they were in the womb.  This can cause your baby’s own blood sugar level to drop 
dangerously low, this condition is called hypoglycemia. 



When a baby is born with high insulin levels the affects are long-lasting.  The baby will grow up and be at a higher than normal risk of developing type 2 diabetes for the rest of its life. These same babies may also suffer from childhood obesity because of the additional fat stores that were creating during pregnancy.  These risks give moms the incentive and drive to stick with the diabetic diet and exercise regime it is the way to give your baby the best start.

#Diabetes and Your Heart for #diabetics #diabetic



Keep your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol as close to normal as possible to protect your heart.
KEEP AT IT. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try to add one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it.
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Having diabetes is hard on your heart. You might worry more about other diabetes complications, like eye, kidney and nerve disease, but did you know that when you have diabetes there is a 80 percent chance you will die of heart disease? It's true; compared to a person who doesn't have diabetes, you are much more likely to have a heart attack, and heart problems are likely to be more severe and to strike you when you are younger.

Heart disease is also tremendously expensive to treat. As a result of the devastating human and economic toll, the medical community is paying much more attention to the diabetes–heart health connection. Scientists are trying to understand it better, and health care providers are trying to do something about it.
Diabetes and heart disease: what's the link?

In addition to the high risks that attend diabetes itself, people with diabetes often have two other major risks factors for heart disease:

    high blood pressure
    high cholesterol and triglyceride levels

Each of these conditions contributes to blood vessel damage; the vessels get blocked and less flexible, cutting off circulation to the heart and making it work too hard. This condition is called cardiovascular disease or CVD for short. People with diabetes are likely to suffer from other large blood vessel conditions, such as stroke, as well.
Be smart about your heart

Keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure and blood fat (cholesterol) levels as close to normal as possible can help keep your blood vessels healthy and protect your heart. Unfortunately, most people with diabetes don't know that. Most aren't aware that heart disease is the most deadly complication of diabetes, and very few know the specific things they can do to maintain heart health.

Recently a coalition of diabetes groups including the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association launched a project to give people with diabetes and their health care providers the information they need. This project is called, “Be Smart About Your Heart: Control the ABCs of Diabetes.” The message is clear: Take control of the ABCs of diabetes care and live a long and healthy life.

A is for A1c. The A1c (”A-one-c”) test – short for hemoglobin A1c – measures your average blood glucose over the last three months.

B is for blood pressure. High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard.

C is for cholesterol. ”Bad” cholesterol or LDL cholesterol builds up and clogs your arteries.

Do you know your ABC numbers? If you don't, be sure to get them from your health care provider. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends an A1c of less than or equal to 6.5 percent, and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends blood pressure below 130/80, and LDL cholesterol below 100. (The ADA recommends that people who have both diabetes and heart disease aim for an LDL cholesterol level below 70, using statin medications to reach this target). If any of your ABC numbers are higher than these targets, talk to your health care provider about actions you can take to reach your ABC targets. These actions could include changing your diet, getting more active, quitting smoking or taking medication.

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Bottom line: anything you do to get closer to your ABC targets helps keep your heart healthy. For more on the “Be Smart About Your Heart” program, and lots of other useful diabetes information, visit the National Diabetes Education Project website at www.ndep.nih.gov or call 1 800 438-5383.

#Diabetics Focusing On The Importance Of Your Feet #diabetes and #diabetic

 
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For many, the first step toward better health starts with better foot care.

This is especially true for the 20.8 million Americans who have diabetes, of which 6.2 million have yet to be diagnosed.

Keeping feet healthy is an essential part of diabetes self-care. Since diabetes affects the nerves and blood vessels in the feet, a daily care regimen can help prevent such serious medical problems as neuropathy, poor circulation and other complications that can lead to amputation.

To provide practical foot care information, the American Diabetes Association has published “101 Tips on Foot Care for People with Diabetes, 2nd Edition” ($14.95) by Neil M. Scheffler, DPM, FACFAS, FAPWCA and Jessie H. Ahroni, Ph.D., ARNP, CDE, BC-ADM.

The book provides the necessary information for daily care, while recognizing the changes that can lead to serious problems.

In an easy-to-read format, the book covers common foot problems, preventative measures, weight and foot problems, changes due to aging, washing the feet, preventing athlete’s foot, toenail care, wearing the proper shoes and socks, treating minor foot problems, exercising and identifying major problems.

“This book is a vital resource for people with diabetes to help save many needless amputations. Especially since the two- to five-year mortality rate is so high following amputation, we wish to also save many lives,” said Dr. Scheffler.
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Here are a few tips to help you start caring for your feet:

• Work with your health care team to keep your blood glucose in your target range.

• Check your feet every day. Look at your bare feet for red spots, cuts, swelling and blisters.

• Be more active. Plan your physical activity program with your health team.

• Wash your feet every day. Dry them carefully, especially between the toes.

• Keep your skin soft and smooth. Rub skin lotion on your feet, but not between toes.

• Trim your toenails straight across and file the edges with an emery board or nail file.

• Wear shoes and socks at all times. Never walk barefoot.


#Diabetics, Foods That Control #Diabetes, #Diabetic

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KEEP AT IT. Making even small changes is hard in the beginning. Try to add one new change a week. If you get off track, start again and keep at it.
In 1550 BC, the famous Ebers Papyrus advised treating diabetes with high fiber wheat grains. Not much has changed since then. Plant foods are the drug of choice for treating diabetes. There are large numbers of scientific research findings to confirm the effectiveness of plant foods in managing this disease. Through the centuries, more than 400 plants have been identified, used, and prescribed as diabetic remedies.

Raw onions and garlic have been long been favorite anti-diabetic drugs in Europe, Asia and the Middle East. The vegetable bitter gourd and the herb ginseng have been widely used for treating diabetes since the ancient time in India and China. Common mushroom is widely used in parts of Europe to lower blood sugar. Barely bread is a popular treatment for diabetes in Iraq. Other foods, used in different countries, in the treatment of diabetes include beans, cabbage, cinnamon, coriander seeds, cucumber, fenugreek seeds, Indian gooseberry and lettuce.

All these foods have anti-diabetic properties. Scientific research has confirmed that most of these foods, or their compounds, either lower blood sugar, or stimulate insulin production. Some of the more important foods that help to lower blood sugar or stimulate insulin production in diabetes patients are discussed here.

Artichoke is a tuberous root with a top like a sunflower. This vegetable contains good amounts of potassium, a fair amount of calcium and some iron and sulphur, all of which are needed by the body for maintaining good health.


Artichoke is beneficial in the treatment of diabetes because of its high insulin content. A fully ripe artichoke is said to contain more than two percent of insulin. Ripe artichokes are generally available only during autumn or fall. The insulin is converted into sugar in winter. Artichokes are most effective when eaten raw in salads. It cooking is required; they should be boiled, unpeeled, in a small quantity of water for about 10 minutes. Artichokes can be effectively combined with other vegetables.