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Dispelling 6 myths about #diabetes: How glyconutrients can help with your diabetes.




Hi all, I’m Alan Brown a Social Media Strategist. I have taken on the mission to make as many people as possible aware of this insidious disease; diabetes. I write for the The Health Network.
I’m also part owner of  Solar Bay Media and involved in some of the “Bay Media” family.
You are about to discover a scientifically proven nutritional supplement that boosts your immune system and gets your diabetes under control.


But before we get too far along, let's dispell with some
"myths" about diabetes.

Myth #1 If You Have Diabetes You Will Always Be Sick
No. Diabetics can lead ordinary, healthy and productive
lives.

Myth #2: If it is in your family, you will get it too.
No. Studies have shown that there is a genetic
predisposition for diabetes, so if it runs in the family, it
should be taken as a sign that individuals may have an
increased risk for developing the disease.

However, a risk does not necessarily mean that individuals
are bound to end up with the disease. There are many
preventative measures that can be taken in order to decrease
risk, such as exercise, healthy diet, and weight
conciseness.

Myth #3 You can catch diabetes from someone else.
No. Although we don't know exactly why some people get
diabetes, we know that diabetes is not contagious. It can't
be caught like a cold or flu. There seems to be some genetic
link in diabetes, particularly Type 2 diabetes. But
environmental factors also play a part.

Myth #4 Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.
No. Diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and
environmental factors. However, being overweight does
increase your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, so if you
have a history of diabetes in your family, a healthy diet
and regular exercise are recommended to control your weight.

Myth #5 People with diabetes can't eat sweets or chocolate.
No. You can have some sugar, but choose wisely.
Sweets are no more out of bounds to people with diabetes
than they are to the rest of us, if eaten as part of a
healthy diet, or combined with exercise. People who take
certain tablets or insulin to treat their diabetes may
sometimes need to eat high-sugar foods to prevent their
blood glucose levels falling too low.
Finally we move to:

Myth #6 People with diabetes can't drink alcohol.
No. You can drink alcohol occasionally if you limit your
intake.
Just because you have diabetes doesn't mean you can't enjoy an occasional alcoholic beverage. If you do, practice
moderation -- no more than a drink or two a few times a
week. Alcohol is full of calories and doesn't supply any
nutrients. Like sugary foods, alcohol is best kept as an
occasional indulgence, and not a regular part of your diet.

Diabetes is a group of diseases that affect the way your
body uses blood sugar (glucose). This sugar is vital to your
health because it's your body's main source of fuel.

Glyconutrients are eight simple sugars that Harpers
Biochemistry, (every Doctor’s biochemistry "bible"), calls
"essential sugars". These are simple sugars or
"monosacharrides" that create cellular communication. They
are responsible for getting your cells to "talk" to one
another.

Today, there are over 350,000 peer-reviewed scientific
papers on glycobiology available for Medical Professionals
to review on the internet. Since 1994 there have been Four
Nobel Prizes for Physiology and Medicine related to the
discovery of these essential sugars.

The fact is regardless of what your wellness issue
glyconutrients will restart your cellular communication.
Cells are a basic building block of our physiology.

Healthy cells make healthy tissues. Healthy tissue makes
healthy organs. Healthy organs make healthy systems. If
your systems are working synergistically together and are
healthy at the cellular level then you do not have a health
problem.

So, it really doesn't matter whether your wellness issue is
diabetes or heart disease or cancer or fibromyalgia or
multiple sclerosis or asthma: glyconutrients work for all
the trillions of cells in your body.

What do glyconutrients really mean to diabetics? Well
for one thing they cut right through both the numerous myths and standard facts of diabetes.

Glyconutrients will change how you deal with your diabetes.
The natural change in your body’s energy after using
glyconutrients will make a noticeable change in your overall
health.

And that’s just the beginning...


More health advice from The Health Network.
 Atkins and South Beach Diets Compared
by: "The Doctors"
http://angelbea1.blogspot.com

Low-carb diets have been in the market for quite some time now. Two of the most common these days are the Atkins and South Beach Diet.


Beginnings
Both were developed by medical doctors (cardiologists) who -- according to reports -- were trying to help Americans lose weight given their high carb diets.

Atkins Diet was the first to be developed and is thus, the more popular. It was developed by the late Dr. Robert C. Atkins as early as the 1972 but became more widely popular -- despite the oppositions -- in the 1990s.

Dr. Arthur Agatston, also a cardiologist but from Mount Sinai Cardiac Prevention Center in Miami Beach, Fla., is known as the father of the South Beach diet. His work came a lot later through his book: "The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss" published in 2003.

Similarities
Both popular diet plans advise dieters to avoid carbohydrates and follow stringent steps to ensure that the significant weight lost during the program does not come back.

Both start with the so-called induction phase where the body of the dieter is "trained" for the routine.

Both diet plans come with suggested food lists where dieters can mix and match foods to suit their tastes. Of course, like other diet plans, both plans advise dieters to stay away from food not included in the lists.

Among the "dont's" in Dr. Atkins' list are fruit, bread, pasta, grains, starchy vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, and some dairy products except cheese, cream, and butter.

Aside from fruit, bread, pasta and vegetables, South Beach dieters are also advised to stay away from potatoes, cereal, rice, and corn, especially for the first two weeks of the induction or introductory period. After this period, these can be slowly re-introduced into the body, albeit in smaller amounts.

Both diet plans have a lifetime "maintenance" phase where hopefully dieters will be so accustomed to either plan that they hardly recognize that they are dieting at all.

Differences
While both diet plans restrict carbohydrate intake, the South Beach diet is said to be more forgiving by not totally eliminating carbs. It distinguishes between "good" and "bad" carbs and even "good" and "bad" fats. South Beach encourages intake of "good" carbs and fats.

Low-sugar carbs with low glycemic index are "good" carbs under the South Beach plan. Food rich in fiber are also recommended.

Atkins's diet routine helps the body to burn fat instead of carb. The goal is to help the dieter achieve good health.
Atkins's diet plan involves four phases while the South Beach plan has three phases.

In both plans, the introductory stage aims to condition the body for some changes to prepare for the program.

In Atkins diet, the body is trained to burn fat instead of sugar to help curb the cravings for sugar and break addiction to some foods.

In South Beach diet, the initial phase involves cutting on high-carb foods, which can be gradually re-introduced in small amounts in the next phase. In this case, South Beach debunks myths that this approach prevents dieters from getting healthy mix from all food groups.

Atkins dieters go through the next following phases: ongoing weight loss, pre-maintenance and lifetime maintenance.
The last two phases of South Beach diet are called re-introduce the carb and diet for life.

What's key in the maintenance phase in Atkins is to keep portions of food at small amounts.

Atkins diet guarantees no hunger deprivation because its long-term goal is healthy diet.

South Beach's promise is a "change in the way of eating," with the dieter not recognizing at all that he is on a diet.
Summarizing the Diets

Atkins Diet
Developed by cardiologist Dr. Robert C. Atkins in 1972, with his “Diet Revolution”, a high-protein, high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet.

The program focuses on a low-carbohydrate diet.

The Program has 4 phases:
1. induction phase (train the body to burn fats instead of carb)
2. ongoing weight loss
3. pre-maintenance
4. lifetime maintenance

South Beach Diet
Developed by cardiologist Dr. Arthur Agatston of Miami, Florida, who in 2003, published the book “The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss".

The program distinguishes between “good” and “bad” carbohydrates, and “good” and “bad” fats.
Take in “good” carbs and fats.

The program has 3 phases:
1. 2-week introductory or induction phase (strictly no carbs)
2. re-introduce the carbs
3. diet for life
angelbay
angelbea3
#diabetes #diabetesmanagement #healthyliving #health #thehealthnetwork

African Americans And Diabetes

African Americans And Diabetes

According to the National Diabetes Education Program, there is a current epidemic of diabetes among African Americans. African Americans are one of the largest groups in the population in the United States that are contracting Type II diabetes. In addition, diabetes is also one of the leading causes of death and disability among African Americans in the United States
The Health Network
There are certain factors that are believed to cause Type II diabetes, which accounts for nearly 95 percent of all cases of the disease. The causes are generally someone with a close relative with the disease, being an African American or being overweight. Other factors include having high blood pressure, high cholesterol and having gestational diabetes while pregnant. It is estimated that about 3.2 million African Americans have Type II diabetes and about one third of them are undiagnosed.
No one is quite sure why African Americans are more likely to get Type II diabetes than any other ethnic group. One thing is certain, however. Poor African Americans are more likely to die from complications of the disease than those in other ethnic groups. This is most likely due to poor health care in certain communities, limited access to drugs that can potentially save their lives and less education. Affluent African Americans have the same chance as other ethnic groups of dying from complications of the disease.

Many people who live in poor communities, in addition to receiving substandard medical care, little education about disease and limited access to lifesaving drugs, also are inundated with fast food restaurants that seem to target certain ethnic groups. Fast foods are usually very high in carbohydrates, fats and offer very little in the way of nutrition. They are inexpensive, however, and many people with little money find this to be the only way they can feed their family on a limited budget. Unfortunately, most of the foods found in fast food restaurants, particularly French fries, are at the top of the Glycemic Index when it comes to foods that should not be consumed by diabetics. French fries are pretty much the staple of any fast food restaurant. They are high in carbohydrates, high in fat and low in protein. But they are filling.
African Americans can prevent acquiring Type II diabetes in many different ways. One way is to take a look at the Glycemic Index and realize which foods are harmful to them and which to avoid. Another way is to start an exercise regime and, if they are overweight, lose some of those excess pounds. If they are without health care, they should contact their local municipality about screening tests for diabetes. Many clinics and health care facilities offer screening tests for diabetes for those with low income for free. This small step may end up saving the life of someone who is on the verge of getting this potentially life threatening illness.
African Americans can also start saying no to fast foods that, in addition to being precursors for diabetes, are also linked to heart disease, high cholesterol and even cancer. Many fast food restaurants prey on people in low income areas without regard for the health of those individuals. African Americans need to realize that they are experiencing an epidemic of Type II diabetes in their community and do all that they can to stamp it out.
Solarbay
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#Diabetes and Exercise

 #Diabetes and Exercise
by: Mike Law
There are two main types of diabetes, type I and type II. Type I diabetes is characterized by the pancreas making too little or no insulin. An individual with diabetes type I will have to inject insulin throughout the day in order to control glucose levels. Type II diabetes, also known as adult onset diabetes, is characterized by the pancreas not producing enough insulin to control glucose levels or the cells not responding to insulin. When a cell does not respond to insulin, it is known as insulin resistance. When a subject is diagnosed with type II diabetes, exercise and weight control are prescribed as measures to help with insulin resistance. If this does not control glucose levels, then medication is prescribed. The risk factors for type II diabetes include: inactivity, high cholesterol, obesity, and hypertension. Inactivity alone is a very strong risk factor that has been proven to lead to diabetes type II. Exercise will have a positive effect on diabetes type II while improving insulin sensitivity while type I cannot be controlled be an exercise program. Over 90% of individuals with diabetes have type II.



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Exercise causes the body to process glucose faster, which lowers blood sugar. The more intense the exercise, the faster the body will utilize glucose. Therefore it is important to understand the differences in training with type I and type II diabetes. It is important for an individual who has diabetes to check with a physician before beginning an exercise program. When training with a diabetic, it is important to understand the dangers of injecting insulin immediately prior to exercise. An individual with type I diabetes injecting their normal amount of insulin for a sedentary situation can pose the risk of hypoglycemia or insulin shock during exercise. General exercise guidelines for type I are as follows: allow adequate rest during exercise sessions to prevent high blood pressure, use low impact exercises and avoid heavy weight lifting, and always have a supply of carbohydrates nearby. If blood sugar levels get too low, the individual may feel shaky, disoriented, hungry, anxious, become irritable or experience trembling. Consuming a carbohydrate snack or beverage will alleviate these symptoms in a matter of minutes.

Before engaging in exercise, it is important for blood sugar levels to be tested to make sure that they are not below 80 to 100 mg/dl range and not above 250 mg/dl. Glucose levels should also be tested before, during, after and three to five hours after exercise. During this recovery period (3-5 hours after exercise), it is important for diabetics to consume ample carbohydrates in order to prevent hypoglycemia.

Exercise will greatly benefit an individual with type II diabetes because of its positive effects on insulin sensitivity. Proper exercise and nutrition are the best forms of prevention for type II diabetics. It is important for training protocols to be repeated almost daily to help with sustaining insulin sensitivity. To prevent hypoglycemia, progressively work up to strenuous activity.

As with individuals with type I diabetes, carbohydrates should also be present during training to assist in raising blood sugar levels if the individual becomes low.

#diabetics #diabetes #nutrition #diet
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Dispelling 6 myths about diabetes: How glyconutrients can help with your diabetes.

Today we are dispelling myths about diabetes
by: Arnold Taylor
http://caprica3.blogspot.com
You are about to discover a scientifically proven nutritional supplement that boosts your immune system and gets your diabetes under control.

But before we get too far along, let's dispell with some
"myths" about diabetes.

Myth #1 If You Have Diabetes You Will Always Be Sick
No. Diabetics can lead ordinary, healthy and productive
lives.

Myth #2: If it is in your family, you will get it too.
No. Studies have shown that there is a genetic
predisposition for diabetes, so if it runs in the family, it
should be taken as a sign that individuals may have an
increased risk for developing the disease.

However, a risk does not necessarily mean that individuals
are bound to end up with the disease. There are many
preventative measures that can be taken in order to decrease
risk, such as exercise, healthy diet, and weight
conciseness.

Myth #3 You can catch diabetes from someone else.
No. Although we don't know exactly why some people get
diabetes, we know that diabetes is not contagious. It can't
be caught like a cold or flu. There seems to be some genetic
link in diabetes, particularly Type 2 diabetes. But
environmental factors also play a part.

Myth #4 Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.
No. Diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and
environmental factors. However, being overweight does
increase your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, so if you
have a history of diabetes in your family, a healthy diet
and regular exercise are recommended to control your weight.

Myth #5 People with diabetes can't eat sweets or chocolate.
No. You can have some sugar, but choose wisely.
Sweets are no more out of bounds to people with diabetes
than they are to the rest of us, if eaten as part of a
healthy diet, or combined with exercise. People who take
certain tablets or insulin to treat their diabetes may
sometimes need to eat high-sugar foods to prevent their
blood glucose levels falling too low.

Myth #6 People with diabetes can't drink alcohol.
No. You can drink alcohol occasionally if you limit your
intake.
Just because you have diabetes doesn't mean you can't enjoy
an occasional alcoholic beverage. If you do, practice
moderation -- no more than a drink or two a few times a
week. Alcohol is full of calories and doesn't supply any
nutrients. Like sugary foods, alcohol is best kept as an
occasional indulgence, and not a regular part of your diet.


Diabetes is a group of diseases that affect the way your
body uses blood sugar (glucose). This sugar is vital to your
health because it's your body's main source of fuel.

Glyconutrients are eight simple sugars that Harpers
Biochemistry, (every Doctor’s biochemistry "bible"), calls
"essential sugars". These are simple sugars or
"monosacharrides" that create cellular communication. They
are responsible for getting your cells to "talk" to one
another.

Today, there are over 350,000 peer-reviewed scientific
papers on glycobiology available for Medical Professionals
to review on the internet. Since 1994 there have been Four
Nobel Prizes for Physiology and Medicine related to the
discovery of these essential sugars.

The fact is regardless of what your wellness issue
glyconutrients will restart your cellular communication.
Cells are a basic building block of our physiology.

Healthy cells make healthy tissues. Healthy tissue makes
healthy organs. Healthy organs make healthy systems. If
your systems are working synergistically together and are
healthy at the cellular level then you do not have a health
problem.

So, it really doesn't matter whether your wellness issue is
diabetes or heart disease or cancer or fibromyalgia or
multiple sclerosis or asthma: glyconutrients work for all
the trillions of cells in your body.

What do glyconutrients really mean to diabetics? Well
for one thing they cut right through both the numerous myths
and standard facts of diabetes.




Glyconutrients will change how you deal with your diabetes.
The natural change in your body’s energy after using
glyconutrients will make a noticeable change in your overall
health.

And that’s just the beginning...

twitter
google.com/+BessieWinnsMedia

5 Simple Steps To Lower Cholesterol

by: Alan Brown

twitter


You can lower cholesterol without drugs by following some basic steps that will not only change your cholesterol readings, but also improve your health today and in the future. So often we use a prescription drug and hope it will magically cure whatever ails us. The truth is prescription drugs for lowering cholesterol do work. The problem is both the short term and long-term side effects.

Even more dangerous than the side effects of prescription drugs to lower cholesterol is not getting cholesterol under control. Over time, high cholesterol can lead to numerous conditions of the heart and arteries, not the least of which are atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), stroke or heart attack.

Here are 5 steps you can take today to lower your cholesterol without prescription drugs.

Eat right. May sound simple, but diet has such a significant impact on lowering cholesterol that it should be the number one factor you look at in determining if your high cholesterol is hereditary or a matter of dietary choices. A low fat and low cholesterol diet is the first step toward lowering cholesterol.

Exercise. Improving cardiovascular health is a step toward reversing the effects of high cholesterol. Exercise itself doesn't directly lower cholesterol, but will strengthen the heart and entire circulatory system.

Quit smoking. If you smoke, the plaque build up in the arteries due to high cholesterol is accelerated. When plaque blocks the flow of blood to the heart, the muscle has to work harder to get oxygen. This can lead to a heart attack. If the arteries get completely blocked with plaque from high cholesterol then a stroke can occur.

Relax. Chronic stress can affect cholesterol levels. If you are constantly stressed and eating a low cholesterol diet, you may not seen any improvement in cholesterol readings until you learn to relieve stress.

Talk to your doctor. Not all doctors are quick to prescribe medications. In fact, the more enlightened doctors will help you form a diet and exercise plan that is suitable for your current overall health and abilities as a first step toward lowering cholesterol. It is always important to ask your doctor if your decision to follow a specific diet or exercise plan is right for you. In addition, do not stop taking medications before consulting with your doctor. You can lower your cholesterol with diet and exercise, and under the care of your doctor, see about removing drugs from the process.

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Understanding Diabetes

First we must understand Diabetes before we can vanquish it.


Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes serious health complications including renal (kidney) failure, heart disease, stroke, and blindness. As mentioned, this serious disease has seen a drastic increase in the number of Americans who are affected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a 2011 report stating that over 25 million Americans are currently plagued by diabetes. That’s an increase of 15 percent, or 3 million people, in only two years and over 700 percent in the last fifty years. More than 40 percent of Americans aged twenty years and older have either diabetes or prediabetes according to a review of data from the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Approximately 30 percent of adults older than sixty have been diagnosed with diabetes, and its prevalence is the same in men and women.
Many people are either unaware that they are diabetic or are in a prediabetic state that will lead to diabetes within a few years. The standard American diet (SAD) causes susceptible individuals to develop diabetes. Unfortunately, most people in America are eating themselves into a premature grave. The American diet is at the core of our health care crisis, and diabetics suffer even more tragic medical complications, such as:

•  Heart disease—Death from heart disease and risk for stroke is three times higher for diabetics.
•  High blood pressure—75 percent of diabetics have high blood pressure (130/180 or higher).
•  Blindness—Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults.
•  Kidney disease—Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure.
•  Nervous system disease—The majority of diabetics develop nervous system impairment such as reduced feeling in the feet, impaired digestion, and erectile dysfunction.
•  Amputations—Diabetes is the leading reason for limb amputations.
•  Cancer—Diabetes increases the risk of cancer, including a 30 percent increase in colorectal cancer.1

Diabetes is also taking a huge financial toll on America. Our unhealthy eating habits may eventually bankrupt our nation. The average type 2 diabetic incurs $6,649 in health care costs directly attributable to diabetes per year.2More than half of Americans will have diabetes or be prediabetic by 2020 at a cost of $3.35 trillion to the U.S. health care system if current trends go on unabated, according to analysis of a report released by UnitedHealth Group. Diabetes and prediabetes will account for the largest percent of health care spending by the end of the decade at an annual cost of almost $500 billion—up from an estimated $194 billion in 2010 according to the report titled The United States of Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in the Decade Ahead.3
In order to prevent this, we have to change the way we approach diabetes—and we must emphasize prevention. Earlier this year, the editors of theLancet medical journal called it a “public health humiliation” that diabetes, a largely preventable disease, has reached such epidemic proportions. In reference to this year’s ADA national meeting, the journal reported, “. . . there is a glaring absence: no research on lifestyle interventions to prevent or reverse diabetes. In this respect, medicine might be winning the battle of glucose control, but is losing the war against diabetes.”4
These authors are correct—this is a public health humiliation because type 2 diabetes is both preventable and reversible. The SAD of refined grains, oils, sugars, and animal products is at the root of the crisis. Using drugs to keep glucose under control in individuals who continue to consume this diet will not prevent diabetes complications. The cure for type 2 diabetes is already known—removing the cause can reverse the disease.

Understanding the Cause
Every cell in the human body needs energy in order to function. The body’s primary energy source is glucose, a simple sugar resulting from the digestion of foods containing carbohydrates (sugars and starches). Glucose from the digested food circulates in the blood as a needed energy source for our cells.
Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. Insulin bonds to a receptor site on the outside of cells and acts like a key to open a doorway into the cell through which glucose can enter.
When there is not enough insulin produced or when the doorway no longer recognizes the insulin key, glucose stays in the blood rather than entering the cells. So diabetes is the rise of glucose in the bloodstream due to a relative lack of the insulin that is responsible for the transfer of glucose from the blood into the tissues or cells. Normally as we eat and the glucose rises in the bloodstream, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas sense the glucose rise in the bloodstream. They then secrete the appropriate amount of insulin to drive the glucose into the body’s tissues, lowering the level in the bloodstream back to an appropriate range.

Blood sugar
greater than 125
= diabetic
Blood sugar
110–125
= prediabetic
Blood sugar
95–110
= not ideal

When a person has type 2 diabetes, the amount of insulin produced is insufficient to lower the glucose level to normal; the level of glucose in the blood remains too high. In type 1, or juvenile, diabetes, the beta cells in the pancreas have been destroyed, so the body does not produce insulin at all. In type 2, or adult-onset diabetes, usually the body is not adequately responding to the insulin being produced. Fat on the body coats the cell membranes and impedes insulin function. The pancreas produces more and more insulin in response, but over time as the pancreas struggles with the extra workload, it eventually loses the fight and becomes unable to meet the unnaturally high demands. As insulin production starts to falter under the increased demands, the glucose in the bloodstream starts to rise. In both cases, with type 1 or type 2, insulin lack or insulin insensitivity, the glucose rises in the bloodstream. If it gets high enough, it also spills over into the urine. Initial symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, lethargy, excessive thirst, and hunger.
The body will attempt to dilute the dangerously high level of glucose in the blood, a condition called hyperglycemia, by drawing water out of the cells and into the bloodstream in an effort to dilute the sugar and excrete it in the urine. It is not unusual for people with undiagnosed diabetes to be constantly thirsty, drink large quantities of water, and urinate frequently as the body tries to get rid of the extra glucose. This creates high levels of glucose in the urine.

Saving the Life of Type 1 Diabetics
Only about 10 percent of diabetics are type 1, also called childhood onset (or juvenile) diabetes because it typically begins in childhood. Type 1 diabetes refers to a disease in which the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are destroyed by the immune system, usually early in life. When the body’s immune system mistakenly targets our own cells instead of a foreign substance, it is called an autoimmune reaction. The causation is complicated and comes about partially as a result of an antibody reaction against a viral protein that mistakenly attacks the beta cells in the pancreas.
In this form, the body produces almost no insulin. It is characterized by a sudden onset and occurs more frequently in populations descended from northern European countries compared to those from southern European countries, the Middle East, or Asia. Type 1 is also called insulin-dependent diabetes because people who develop this type need to have daily injections of insulin.
Approximately 80 percent of our at-rest energy is used by the brain. Under normal situations, the body can only function on glucose; however, when there is insufficient insulin, the brain and other tissues are unable to utilize the glucose in the bloodstream. When the body is unable to utilize glucose stores normally, free fatty acids will rise in the bloodstream. The body can make ketones from these fats, and then the brain and heart can use the ketones as an emergency fuel, when unable to get sufficient glucose. Glucose and ketones build up in the blood and can have devastating consequences. For example, type 1 diabetics are more prone to developing ketoacidosis, which can be life threatening if left untreated, leading to coma and death. Ketones are moderately elevated in blood and urine during fasting or significant carbohydrate restriction, but they can get to dangerously high levels in decompensated or untreated type 1 diabetes. Ketosis (high ketones in the blood) and ketoacidosis can occur in type 2 diabetics in some circumstances as well. It is the combination of the high glucose level in the blood along with the high level of ketones that can lead to dangerous acidosis and dehydration.
Type 1 diabetes is not caused by weight gain or obesity, and people with type 1 diabetes will always require insulin to prevent serious issues with high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and other life-threatening conditions. Even so, a superior nutritional diet is essential for health and longevity of a type 1 diabetic, and even though excess body fat is dangerous for everyone, it is more dangerous for the type 1 diabetic.
I am often asked, “Is your program appropriate for type 1 diabetics? Will insulin be required forever, no matter what?” The answer to both questions is yes. Unlike a type 2 diabetic, if you are a type 1 diabetic, you can never stop taking insulin entirely. However, after adopting this high-nutrient dietary approach, you will need much less insulin, in most cases about half as much as before, following the typical ADA approach. The need for less insulin is not the only major reason for type 1 diabetics to follow this diet style. The vital reason is that it can save a type 1 from serious health complications later in life.

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4 Important Facts You Should Know About Whey Protein



Are you concerned about taking care of your body before and after
strenuous activities or workouts? Do you try to avoid supplements
that contain additives and possible side effects?

If you are interested in better health and improved physical
fitness you have surely heard that bodybuilders and other
athletes are turning to a simple, natural supplement called whey
protein.

WHY DO ATHLETES USE WHEY PROTEIN?

Protein levels are depleted through exercise. Muscles require
amino acids to prevent deterioration, give endurance and build
mass. Proteins supply these amino acids to the muscles which is
why athletes use whey protein.

WHAT IS WHEY PROTEIN?

Commercial whey protein comes from cow's milk. Whey is the
by-product of making cheese and was usually thrown away as a
waste product. Now researchers know that whey protein is high
quality, natural protein that is rich with amino acids essential
for good health and muscle building. It is naturally found in
mother's milk and also used in baby formula. It is being
considered for use as a fortifier of grain products because of
its considerable health benefits and bland flavor.

Although protein is also found in other foods such as meat, soy
and vegetables, whey protein is proven to have the highest
absorption (digestion) levels in comparison to all others.

WHO SHOULD CONSIDER USING WHEY PROTEIN?

Whey protein has many health benefits including immune support,
bone health, sports health, weight management and overall well
being.

Because amino acids are 'building blocks' for the human body it
is sometimes used by patients to speed up the healing of wounds
or burns.

The high quality protein that comes from whey makes it a
recommended choice for those who need optimal benefits from
restricted diets including diabetics, those on weight management
diets and even ill patients not able to consume enough protein in
their diet to assist with healing.

CAN WHEY PROTEIN BE DANGEROUS?

Whey protein is a food and so it does not have have the risks
associated with other supplements. That said, too much of
anything carries risks. Extremely high use of whey protein can
overload the liver which can cause serious problems. Moderation
is always recommended.

If you are lactose intolerant you might try whey protein isolate
which has less than 1% lactose and should be tolerable for most
users.

Whey protein is a natural and healthy way to bring protein into
your diet and increase well being.

The information contained in this article is for educational purposes
only and is not intended to medically diagnose, treat or cure any
disease. Consult a health care practitioner before beginning any
health care program. 

#diabetics 
Mo